LETTERS FROM MONA -Part 37- November 1 to November 15, 1914

November 1, 1914

Dear Diary,

Here it is a new month already. I was so busy in October I hardly had time to catch my breath. I feel plum tuckered out today. We went to the dance in Donald last night and didn’t get back here until this morning.  Last night was a special campaign dance so we also had to endure listening to the long-winded speeches of the different candidates before the dancing commenced. It makes me yawn just thinking about it now. I will probably find it more interesting when I’m 21 and can vote.

Of course, there was also lots of talk about the war in Europe. I cannot bear the thought of our boys having to go to war.  And God forbid what if Roy had to go?  What if all this waiting is for naught because a bullet takes his life. I must stop thinking that way, for as Mama says it’s no use brooding over what hasn’t happened.

There also was talk at the dance that Black foot disease is showing up in the cattle around here again. Such a nasty disease and kills the poor cattle so fast. Hopefully, the vet gets out here to inoculate the ones that need it so there won’t be much loss.

We still don’t have a firm date on when we are going to Belle Fourche. Papa has not located any work so I guess we will wait as long as possible to go so we don’t have to pay so much rent. So far the weather has been good just a little snowstorm that melted right away about 2 weeks ago. So much to arrange though, our neighbors have agreed to watch after the few animals we have. We will butcher our three pigs before we go. And of course, our horses will go with us.

But this not knowing when and where we are going is leaving things up in the air with Roy visiting this winter. In fact, he is wondering if he should come at all. I think Mama and Papa would be happier if he didn’t visit. But I can’t bear that thought he just must come. I adore him with all my heart I could not bear the rest of the year if I didn’t see him this winter.

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November 5,1914

Dear Diary,

I am sitting here by the window watching it pour outside while inside te air is filled with the yeasty smell of freshly baked bread and the heat from the stove envelopes me like a warm shawl. As soon as the bread cools a bit, I am going to slice a thick hunk, slather it in clotted cream and sprinkle it with cinnamon and sugar. I tell you there is not a better treat to have alongside a fresh brewed cup of coffee. Then I should get busy working on dinner preparations. Mama has taken to bed; she is not feeling well. I sure hope she does not have another bad spell like she had last winter.

Hazel and Daniel are helping Papa get the wood chopped and stacked for winter. They surely will be starving when they come in. I think I will fry up some big hunks of ham and make some baking powdered biscuits and open a jar of green beans. I am getting to be a mighty fine biscuit maker even Mama says so.

Guess I best venture out into the rain and rustle up that ham and those beans so I will be ready to make dinner when the time comes.

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November 7, 1914

Dear Diary,

Here I sit with the worse toothache I ever did have. It’s so bad I can hardly think, it is as if the whole side of my head is about to explode. I made a big mistake going to see if Mr. Barrett could fix it. He’s not a real dentist but has a little training. It didn’t feel bad when I got up to leave. But all the jostling and bumping of the wagon coming home set it to throbbing. By the time we turned into the barnyard it hurt so bad I was ready to go wild. It’s a little better now that I am sitting quietly and have a piece of ice on it. I am afraid I may have to have it pulled.

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November 8, 1914

Dear Diary,

My tooth still hurts, I nearly went wild last night. I spent the whole night sitting up as it was the only way to get even a bit of relief. I hardly slept until it was almost daylight, then for some reason it started to feel better. I decided a distraction would be good so I walked with Mama over to the Sim’s place for our Book and Thimble club meeting. I took the socks I am knitting for Roy along with me. I am getting to be a surprisingly good knitter much better than a year ago. I would never been able to make a pair of socks that someone would wear then. Still I prefer sewing. I love looking in the Sears and Roebuck catalog and trying to create the same thing. I don’t even need a pattern anymore.

We have been reading the “Chronicles of Avonlea.” I really felt for poor Theodora, she sounded a bit like me. Except I surely hope I do not have to wait 15 years for Roy to propose, waiting until I turn 21 seems like an eternity as it is. Roy and his darn word. He wrote that he thought it would have been a shame if Clarence had left Vera behind, yet he leaves me at the end of every winter. I know there is no work for him here. If only he hadn’t promised papa he would wait until I was 21 to ask for my hand in marriage. I know Roy loves me and will always cherish me. I am so tired of waiting; I am ready now.

Speaking of Vera, I had another card from her. They arrived in Nebraska 10 days ago. She said the only problem they had the whole trip is when an auto on the Lincoln Highway near Buffalo Gap caused the horses to run away. They had to stop for 3 hours to repair the damage caused to the wagon. She said she’d write a lot more once they get settled and in a place of their own to live. Oh, how I long for a place Roy and I can call our own. 

The topic of politics came up at our book club. Most of the women are disgruntled with the men who think women should not concern themselves with it. Well we feel differently. We have as much vested interest in what is going on as men do. So, why shouldn’t we vote. I am as smart as any man. I am glad that Roy values my thoughts and opinions and doesn’t see me as some silly bit of fluff incapable of hard thinking.

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November 10, 1914

Dear Diary,

Today was election day. I feel proud that my state was the first to grant women the right to vote. That’s one thing I don’t like about Washington state, women still are not allowed to vote.  

Here It’s sort of a holiday, the schoolhouse gets all spruced up and families go in hand and hand to cast their paper ballots. Afterwards folks have a good time visiting from wagon to wagon exchanging gossip and good things to eat.

I’m afraid we didn’t do much of that on account of my tooth was still bothering me. Papa drove me over to Mr. Barret’s for him to so some more work on it. He says I need to see a proper dentist when I get to Belle Fourche but he did succeed in getting it to stop aching. I bet I sleep like a log tonight for I haven’t slept much the last 2 nights.

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